LILA ~ Learning Innovations Laboratory at the Harvard Graduate School of Education

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  1. Marga Biller

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    Research suggests that work-relevant learning occurs largely on the job. However, in many situations workers do not learn nearly as much as they might. The "three stances" model helps to explain why. The stances model suggests ways to counter this tendency and enhance learning from work.
  2. Marga Biller

    2019-2020 LILA Ecologies of Learning in a Transforming World

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    Learning ecologies offers a perspective on how organizations can develop new capabilities, organize work, and manage careers in order to take advantage of the new world order. The idea of a learning ecology recognizes that learning is unfolding all the time in complex ways, through peer relationships, networks, informal coaching, the way people interact in person and virtually, etc. which can be learning-synergistic or not. What people are learning includes not only particular skills and understandings that formal learning might target, but also the "hidden curriculum" – how to informally pick up on the patterns of survival and thriving within the organization.
  3. Marga Biller

    Join us for the 13th Annual LILA Summit with Rob Cross and Ryan Quinn

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    This has been another intriguing year at LILA as we have taken on the theme of Collective Mindfulness: Shaping the Human Systems in Organizations. I hope that you will join us at this year’s LILA Summit on June 12th in Cambridge where the two keynote speakers are Rob Cross and Ryan Quinn. They will be joined by six past LILA faculty who will share their latest research with participants during small group conversations. In these sessions, you will have an opportunity to exchange ideas on how the research can inform your individual and organizational practices. The Summit is also a great occasion to meet and interact with the broader LILA community, including faculty, researchers, and current and past members, and to get a better sense as to who we are as a learning community and what you might experience as a member.
  4. Marga Biller

    How to spot collective mindfulness?

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    Mindfulness is a challenge of attention allocation. We tend to have both eyes on the current main thing, everything else is on autopilot. Mindful means were moving the main thing along and keeping one eye out for the yellow flags we might miss.
  5. Marga Biller

    Becoming Collectively Mindful

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    When struggling to gain collective mindfulness in your organization, it could be useful to examine the role of collective identity in supporting or undermining collective mindfulness. You may find that, even though a clear purpose and goal have been set forth, there are still pockets of the organization that are not moving forward in a collective way. Is it due to a weak collective identity, or maybe to a strong collective identity that overrides collective mindfulness?
  6. Daniel Wilson

    How can organizations prevent burnout?

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    In high reliability environments, employees are being pushed beyond their limits. People become emotionally exhausted when they are asked to pay more attention, look for new signals, and looking for discrepant and rare events. Tim Vogus noted that organizations that engage in high reliability have higher levels of emotional exhaustion. He found that organizations that establish compassion practices prevent burnout and increase high reliability.
  7. Daniel Wilson

    Using the past to create the future with Davide Ravasi

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    How do organizations use their history to understand and reform identity to support transformation?   Radical change can often be destructive so it is interesting to note how organizations look back to their history to create continuity in org identity while changing. Davide’s more recent research identifies the variety of historical mechanisms that organizations use to shape identity. One way is using collective memory – the shared memories of communities that get passed down, the rituals of remembrance, and symbolic objects and places to embody collective memory. For example, corporate museums are places that give quite a bit of evidence of...

Harvard Graduate School of Education